RESPONSIBILITY

Our Packaging Journey: Why We’ve Moved Away From Paper.

Max Shaw / 5 min read

Every product has been sent out in a paper bag since 2013. This year we’ve decided to go one bettter.

A coworker once told me I should never throw away a bike part, no matter how useless it may seem. His shop always drove me crazy, random components fighting for space with new, undoubtedly useful ones. “Just wait,” he’d say. “One day you’ll need it, and it’ll be the one part you can’t find anywhere.

“Or you’ll spot it when you’re searching for something else, and it’ll end up being just the part you wanted.”

My brother Jake is annoyingly good at figuring out what people want. When it comes to giving, he rarely asks for ideas; instead, he keeps a “potential gifts” list on his phone that he appends year-round. I, on the other hand, tend to be a reactively practical gift-giver: I notice things people need but don’t have the time or knowledge to take care of themselves.

Paper Bags, No More.

A coworker once told me I should never throw away a bike part, no matter how useless it may seem. His shop always drove me crazy, random components fighting for space with new, undoubtedly useful ones. “Just wait,” he’d say. “One day you’ll need it, and it’ll be the one part you can’t find anywhere.

“Or you’ll spot it when you’re searching for something else, and it’ll end up being just the part you wanted.”

“Or you’ll spot it when you’re searching for something else, and it’ll end up being just the part you wanted.”

My brother Jake is annoyingly good at figuring out what people want. When it comes to giving, he rarely asks for ideas; instead, he keeps a “potential gifts” list on his phone that he appends year-round. I, on the other hand, tend to be a reactively practical gift-giver: I notice things people need but don’t have the time or knowledge to take care of themselves.

Paper Bags, No More.

Sub Talk about your brand

A coworker once told me I should never throw away a bike part, no matter how useless it may seem. His shop always drove me crazy, random components fighting for space with new, undoubtedly useful ones. “Just wait,” he’d say. “One day you’ll need it, and it’ll be the one part you can’t find anywhere.

“Or you’ll spot it when you’re searching for something else, and it’ll end up being just the part you wanted.”

My brother Jake is annoyingly good at figuring out what people want. When it comes to giving, he rarely asks for ideas; instead, he keeps a “potential gifts” list on his phone that he appends year-round. I, on the other hand, tend to be a reactively practical gift-giver: I notice things people need but don’t have the time or knowledge to take care of themselves.